Coaches Information (Kitchener Minor Hockey)

PrintCoaches Information

What Is A Coach?

A coach is a teacher, a mentor, a role model, and sometimes a friend. 
- puts player first:
Children go through development stages themselves and uses age-appropriate coaching strategies. Values long-term welfare of his players more than looking good as a coach. Winning is in conflict with long-term benefit of the athletes. Always has commitment. 
- develops character as well as skills:
Positive coach uses the competition as a classroom. Builds self confidence and positive characteristics. Loyal to all players.
- honours the game:
Feel obligation to the sport you coach. Loves the sport and shares love and enjoyment with the players. You should feel privileged tone able to take a part in the sport. Has respect for all aspects such as, the refs, players, other coaches, and parents. Positive coaching should be anywhere and everywhere. 

  • Creates a safe environment in which people see themselves more clearly; the coach does this by listening, asking focused questions, reflecting back, challenging, and acknowledging the clients
  • Asks for more intentional thought, action, and behavior changes than the client would have asked of him or herself
  • Clarifies goals and agreed-upon results
  • Identifies gaps between where the client is and where the client needs or wants to be
  • Helps the client develop a strong strategy and action plan to close the gap
  • Understands and anticipates potential obstacles
  • Guides the building of the structure, accountability, and support necessary to ensure sustained commitment

12658924-coaching-concept-related-words-in-tag-cloud-isolated-on-white.jpg



Basics of a Coach

  • know the game and the rules
  • have a positive attitude 
  • game plans

  • practice plans

  • first aid/ Cpr

  • a lot of extra time

  • coaching certificate appropriate to the level you are coaching

  • always be on time

  • keep game logs

  • be honest

  • be a good role model

To Apply click here: http://kitchenerminorhockey.com/Pages/7302/Volunteer_Opportunities/

coachinghockey.jpg


Why get involved?

  • as parents we want to spend time with our child in an active way
  • as individuals we want to volunteer and get involved in our community
  • as teachers we have taken on extra-curricular school activities
  • as athletes we want to pursue our passion in a different direction and give back to our community
  • as fans we simply love sport and want to give coaching a tryPractice-Plan-Prepare-300x300.jpg

But what does a coach do?  

  • encourage to be active and to have fun
  • plan practices
  • lead their team in developing gross motor skills
  • help team identify how to improve their performance
  • manage problems by making appropriate decisions
  • create a safe environment
  • teach others how to respect themselves, others, and their sport                         


progressionchart.jpg



Hockey Coach’s Checklist

  • Set your goals. Spend time before the season starts to consider your hopes, expectations, and priorities for yourself and your team. Write them down.

  • Be prepared. Use your goals to plan your overall season including what you want to accomplish monthly, weekly, and daily in practices and games.

  • Carry a positive attitude. Every day, bring an upbeat attitude to the team and to each player you deal with on the team.

  • Dispense positive reinforcement. Catch players doing things right. When you do, you reinforce the behavior and performance you want.

  • Provide motivation. Motivation comes from within the individual players, not from your “Rah! Rah!” speeches. Fun and praise pave the most direct route to motivated players.

  • Instill pride. You want your players to wear your team jersey with pride every day. Develop a team reputation that they can all feel proud of.

  • Show confidence. Confidence comes from knowing what you’re doing and that you can do it. Educate yourself; become knowledgeable about the game. Ask questions. Learn.

  • Cultivate good work habits. Lead by example on this one. Do your homework; come to practices and games prepared. Work tirelessly with the kids and help them discover that a little hard work pays off in spades.

  • Cultivate positive self images. Help players believe in themselves so that they can feel great about themselves as players and as people.

  • Provide great practices. Have players moving, participating, succeeding, learning, and laughing.

  • Balance game coaching. Make games fun and positive at the same time as players learn from their experiences.

  • Be safety conscious. Be medically informed about those you’re working with. Check equipment and facilities. Know emergency procedures.

  • Show respect. Everyone you work with deserves to be shown some respect. That includes the players, parents, officials, and your assistants. Respect sets a tone for the team.

  • Teach and challenge. Start simple. Progress step-by-step. Know where the kids are in their skills so that you can lead them a little further forward and reward them for getting there.

  • Pay attention. Every kid wants to feel valued in some way. Talk to the kids. Know their names. Find out something unique about them. Point out something they do well, daily.

  • Set a great example. Lead by example in attitude, enthusiasm, and sportsmanship. Your team, and even most parents, will follow.

  • Control the parents. Lead. Set rules and consequences. Clearly communicate those rules and consequences. Do not waver from what you set and communicate. But have fun with them as much as possible.

  • Dispense discipline. Make sure all players know that the team comes first. Anything that disrupts or hurts the team or individual team members is not acceptable. Make sure that they know the consequences of unacceptable behavior and dole it out when necessary, with consistency.

  • Use your creativity. Be adaptable and creative when things don’t work out as you expected. Design your own drills. Find tricks to help kids learn. Adjust in lousy facilities. You’ll all get more out of the experience.

  • Have FUN!

Hockey

Hockey Canada offers the following NCCP workshops. Please click the download button under each clinic to view a PDF with more information.

Intro Coach: This clinic is soon to be NCCP recognized, and is an ideal starting place for coaches working with athletes that are six years old or younger. The clinic runs for 4 hours (or more) and will teach you basic hockey skills as well as fun ways to encourage athlete participation and enjoyment.

Coach Stream: Coaching at the community level is about getting your young athletes participating, learning age-appropriate skills, and having fun! This clinic will give you the tools you need to make ethical decisions and to conduct fun, safe, and effective skills both on and off the ice.

Download

Development 1: If you are just starting to coach at the competitive level, you will find this clinic invaluable! Learn the importance of creating a season plan and what components it should include. Identify and assess the athletic abilities that your athletes will need to succeed in competitive hockey, then set and monitor progress goals.

You will also learn the logistics of scheduling practices, games and meetings, as well as how to effectively communicate team and individual progress with your athletes and their guardians.

 

Hockey

Hockey Canada offers the following NCCP workshops. Please click the download button under each clinic to view a PDF with more information.

Intro Coach: This clinic is soon to be NCCP recognized, and is an ideal starting place for coaches working with athletes that are six years old or younger. The clinic runs for 4 hours (or more) and will teach you basic hockey skills as well as fun ways to encourage athlete participation and enjoyment.

Coach Stream: Coaching at the community level is about getting your young athletes participating, learning age-appropriate skills, and having fun! This clinic will give you the tools you need to make ethical decisions and to conduct fun, safe, and effective skills both on and off the ice.

Download

Development 1: If you are just starting to coach at the competitive level, you will find this clinic invaluable! Learn the importance of creating a season plan and what components it should include. Identify and assess the athletic abilities that your athletes will need to succeed in competitive hockey, then set and monitor progress goals.

You will also learn the logistics of scheduling practices, games and meetings, as well as how to effectively communicate team and individual progress with your athletes and their guardians.

 

HideOrganization Menu
Social Networking
Follow Us On
Follow Kitchener Minor Hockey on Twitter
- and -
Visit Kitchener Minor Hockey on Facebook
Manage Subscriptions
Signup to receive email or text messages for the teams you want to follow.
Printed from kitchenerminorhockey.com on Monday, August 21, 2017 at 1:32 PM